HelloFresh vs Gousto: A Fake Foodie Review

Culinary disaster, that's me in a nutshell. Or at least it was. Until I hit my twenties, I was the sort of person who could burn soup. One time I tried to make a Moroccan chicken dish for a bunch of friends and my mum had to take over in order to save the house … Continue reading HelloFresh vs Gousto: A Fake Foodie Review

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Literacy is a superpower

Matilda is one of my favourite literary heroines - strong-minded, smart, sassy, an enthusiast in life. And Roald Dahl's novel, other than being the rebellious nerd's handbook to growing up good, has a very special message I don't think any other makes quite so brilliantly: books are magic (uniquely, portably so) and they give us power - super powers - that we barely notice. Here are my musings upon that, with some ideas for how we can become Real Life Superheroes.

Writing, Fintech & Multipotential Lives

I am not trying to sell you a new job (although we are hiring if you’re awesome and want to work with me) but this blog does ask you to examine your idea of "careerism". If you stop half way, you may suffer from the following symptoms: confusion, anxiety, nausea, uncontrollable weeping and intense itchiness of the feet. If you do experience any of these, don’t worry, it’ll pass once you get off your butt and change your stars.

7 Imaginative But Most Peculiar Novels About Death

When it comes to trying to make sense of death, dying, grief and loss, many revert to telling stories – in these book reviews, written for the wonderful Death & The Maiden blog, I look at seven books that explore death and our relationship with it in interesting, imaginative, far from morbid ways. “They are books exploring our relationship with death – how we construct horrors and hopes around dying, how we use story to sooth our anxieties and investigate our fascinations with the deceased.” Why not pop over to Death & The Maiden and check them out?

Death & the Maiden

Writer, blogger and self proclaimed word-nerd Harriet Allner, presents the first in a series of special posts for Death & the Maiden that explore death in literature. This week’s novels take various questions about human life and death, exploring them in interesting, challenging ways. Examining how we construct horrors and hopes around dying, how we use story to sooth our anxieties and investigate our fascinations with the deceased.

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No Taboo, No Problem: Writing about Controversial Topics

Tuesday, 7.30pm, logging on to twitter. I’m leaving work, passing elegant Georgian houses-turned-offices, cutting through leafy squares full of exhausted suits, smiling when I run into someone with a friendly dog that doesn’t care that it’s London and talking to strangers just isn’t the done thing. There’s something about that time of the day: the shackles … Continue reading No Taboo, No Problem: Writing about Controversial Topics

6 Books To Challenge The Way You Think About Thinking

If you're like me and you chase that feeling where it's like an author has just bitchslapped your brain with a brilliant idea, when you can feel your hair stand on end because you *just never thought of it that way before*, or when your whole world turns into a warm ball of goo because everything has been tilted on its axis and you barely know up from down anymore then here are six non-fiction books for you (fiction recommendations coming soon).

On Silence & Speaking Up (Or Why Our Voices Matter)

The way we react and talk about trauma has changed thanks to the rise of social media and 24-hr news cycles. Recently, we saw this following the massacre in Orlando, the murder of MP Jo Cox, the EU Referendum more generally. All very different events. All followed by outpourings of grief, condolence, anger, support that went viral and … Continue reading On Silence & Speaking Up (Or Why Our Voices Matter)